Russia Is A Terrorist State: Part 1 – The 1990s

Spread the love

Putin Is A War Criminal:

Russia Is A Terrorist State

Russia Is A Terrorist State
Protests Against War in Ukraine 059 – Three Tyrants Stalin Putin Hitler 2” by Amaury Laporte under CC BY 2.0

Vladimir Putin is a terrorist and a war criminal. He has utilized KGB-era narrative control devices to flood social media with disinformation. Here is the history of his path of destruction.

Part 1: The 1990s

 

1990. Brussels. Germany Unification.

"President George H. W. Bush and President Mikhail Gorbachev sign United States/Soviet Union agreements to end chemical weapon production and begin destroying their respective stocks in the East Room of the White House, Washington, DC on the 1st of June 1990" under Public Domain by The Executive Office of the President of the United States
President George H. W. Bush and President Mikhail Gorbachev sign United States/Soviet Union agreements to end chemical weapon production and begin destroying their respective stocks in the East Room of the White House, Washington, DC on the 1st of June 1990” under Public Domain by The Executive Office of the President of the United States

A beautiful, transformative moment for the world and geopolitics – the fall of the Berlin Wall and the reunification of Germany, signaling the final definitive end of the horrors of the aftermath of World War 2 – has been corrupted and distorted by the disinformation agents of Vladimir Putin. While Putin loves to claim that NATO – The North Atlantic Treaty Organization – vowed to not expand Eastward with the dissolution of the Warsaw Pact, no such vow was ever made. Someone who was personally there – former President of the Soviet Union Mikhail Gorbachev – has disavowed such notions.

The only agreement made was that NATO would not deploy forces into the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) unless and until Soviet forces have withdrawn and that NATO would not station weapons of mass destruction – including nuclear warheads – into Berlin. NATO fulfilled the obligations of that agreement – as stated by Gorbachev himself, and Gorbachev believed that the German State – along with every country including former Warsaw Pact nations – should be able to freely able to choose their alliances. There was no such discussion regarding the expansion of NATO Eastward – that concept is nothing more than a myth perpetrated by Putin. In reality, NATO expansion has been a direct result of Putin’s escalating aggression toward the West.

The Atlantic Alliance and European Security in the 1990s – NATO May 17, 1991

Did NATO Promise Not to Enlarge? Gorbachev Says “No” – BROOKINGS November 6, 2014

‘There was no promise not to enlarge NATO’ – Harvard Law Today May 16, 2022

 

1994. Budapest. Ukraine-Russia Budapest Memorandum.

"U.S. President Clinton, Russian President Yeltsin, and Ukrainian President Kravchuk after signing the Trilateral Statement in Moscow on 14 January 1994." under Public Domain by U.S. government employee, photo from William J. Clinton Presidential Library
U.S. President Clinton, Russian President Yeltsin, and Ukrainian President Kravchuk after signing the Trilateral Statement in Moscow on 14 January 1994.” under Public Domain by U.S. government employee, photo from William J. Clinton Presidential Library

When the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R. or the Soviet Union) disbanded in 1991, its nuclear arsenal was scattered throughout the now post-Soviet States. Ukraine had the largest cache of these weapons – 1,900 warheads – making Ukraine the third largest nuclear superpower in the world, only behind Russia and the United States. Both Russia and the United States viewed a nuclear-armed Ukraine as an international liability and sought to denuclearize the country. A deal was reached in 1994 to facilitate the denuclearization of Ukraine – The Budapest Memorandum.

Under The Budapest Memorandum, Ukraine agreed to denuclearize under three conditions:

  1. Ukraine wanted financial compensation for the value of the uranium of the nuclear warheads – which could be repurposed as fuel for nuclear reactors. This condition was fulfilled by Russia.
  2. Ukraine could not afford to eliminate its intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), ICBM silos, and bombers and requested that this endeavor be subsidized. The United States provided financial subsidies under the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction program, fulfilling this condition.
  3. Ukraine wanted its territorial borders at the time of the Budapest Memorandum to be internationally honored with security assurances. Under Putin, this condition has been broken in 2014 with the Crimean invasion and illegal annexation and in 2022 with the full-scale Ukrainian invasion and annexation of multiple territories under sham referendums. United States fulfilled their commitment thus far with considerable military assistance with weapons aid packages, financial subsidies for infrastructure and Ukraine’s economy, and rallying NATO allies to offer similar support following Putin’s 2022 invasion.

Why care about Ukraine and the Budapest Memorandum – BROOKINGS December 5, 2019

Why Ukraine gave up its nuclear weapons — and what that means in an invasion by Russia – NPR February 21, 2022

 

1995. Chechnya. Grozny Bombings.

"A Chechen stands in the street during the battle for Grozny in January 1995" by Mikhail Evstafiev under CC BY-SA 3.0
A Chechen stands in the street during the battle for Grozny in January 1995” by Mikhail Evstafiev under CC BY-SA 3.0

Two weeks after Moscow engaged in warfare – the first Chechen War – with southern separatists in the region of Chechnya, Moscow began its indiscriminate shelling campaign upon the Chechnyan capital of Grozny on December 31, 1994. Despite Russian State TV assuring the public that the Capital had been surrounded and secured by federal troops, there were no troops to be found when entering or exiting the city. What was to be found was the rotten smell of damaged natural gas lines from the shelling campaign, and many residential units risked explosion at any time.

Once the sun had set, the smell was accompanied by the blueish-red flames of the ruptured lines. These lines, supplying needed infrastructure to residential areas – not military compounds – were the target of Russian aggression.  These lines set the scene backdropped by destroyed vehicles, hungry dogs seeking food, and decomposing Russian soldiers from the initial wave of aggression. Inhabitants had moved underground for survival below wave after wave of continued shelling – despite Russian State TV telling citizens that Russian President Boris Yelstin had assured the city had been evacuated.

"A Chechen fighter runs past a burnt Russian armoured personnel vehicle (BMP-2) during the battle for Grozny" by Mikhail Evstafiev under CC BY-SA 2.5 and CC BY-SA 3.0
A Chechen fighter runs past a burnt Russian armored personnel vehicle (BMP-2) during the battle for Grozny in January 1995 ” by Mikhail Evstafiev under CC BY-SA 2.5 and CC BY-SA 3.0

The aggression was not proportional to the rebellion. The rebels had no fighting aircraft or any considerable number of heavy equipment. They had simple hand combat weaponry – machine guns, grenade launchers, and hand grenades. The singular antiaircraft weapon they did have was repurposed from a damaged armored personnel carrier. The landscape was littered with bodies and vehicles burnt from the flames of the shelling campaigns. This rebel’s spirit outlasted the campaigns, however, and a peace agreement was signed with Russia, allowing Chechnya to have independent elections.

Journey Into Hell: A Reporter Remembers Moscow’s Assault On Grozny In 1995 – RFERL January 5, 2020

 

 

1997. Kyiv. Russian-Ukrainian Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation, and Partnership/”Big Treaty”.

"President Boris Yeltsin and Mintimer Shaimiev”. Federal President Boris Yeltsin (left) congratulating President of Tatarstan Mintimer Shaimiev (right) on getting state award" by Commons: RIA Novosti/Sergey Guneev under CC BY-SA 3.0
Federal President Boris Yeltsin” by Commons: RIA Novosti/Sergey Guneev under CC BY-SA 3.0

On May 31, 1997, Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma and Russian President Boris Yeltsin met in Kyiv to sign the Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation, and Partnership. The treaty acknowledged that both countries would respect the borders and rights of the citizens of the other country. The treaty recognized Crimea as Ukrainian territory and allowed Russia’s Black Sea Fleet to continue operations out of the Ukrainian-controlled Crimean port. There were no conditions regarding NATO expansion, nor any clauses banning Ukraine from joining NATO, in the treaty.

Setting Past Aside, Russia and Ukraine Sign Friendship Treaty – The New York Times June 1, 1997

Independent Ukraine – Britannica April 22, 2016

 

 

1999. Serbia.

"Kosovo massacres by Serbs on Albanians 1998-199. Source and researched by Pandion Research" by Norascije under CC BY-SA 4.0
Kosovo massacres by Serbs on Albanians 1998-199. Source and researched by Pandion Research” by Norascije under CC BY-SA 4.0

After years of the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) escalating violent attacks against the Serbian State in an armed uprising, Yugoslavian State actors responded with unparalleled atrocities forcing waves of refugees to flee. This culminated with Yugoslavian and Serbian forces engaging in ethnic cleansing, with the United Nations Security Council condemning the excessive force. With no yielding of the ethnic cleansing, NATO was forced to step in March 1999 with 11 air strikes and bombings until June 199 when NATO and Yugoslavia signed a peace accord – with NATO troop withdrawal in exchange for the return of almost a million ethnic Albanians and a half million displaced locals being allowed to return to their homes. UN peacekeeping forces were deployed to Kosovo as the area came under UN administration.

Kosovo conflict – Brittanica September 5, 2015

Putin has repeatedly falsely repainted these events NATO peacekeeping actions as “NATO redrawing global borders” with Russian State propaganda as justification for his own redrawing of global borders and his abuses of international human rights.

Russia uses 1999 NATO bombing in media war over Crimea – Reuters March 24, 2014

 

1999. Moscow Apartment Bombings.

"Consequences of the explosion of a residential building in Volgodonsk" by Yotub under CC0 1.0
Consequences of the explosion of a residential building in Volgodonsk” by Yotub under CC0 1.0

By the summer of 1999, Boris Yeltsin’s approval rating was a dismal 2%, and his hand-picked successor Vladimir Putinvirtually no chance of winning the election to become Russia’s President. That was until more than 200 people were killed in September 1999 apartment bombings – a false flag operation with the intent of undermining and – successfully – reshaping Russian public opinion with terror. With no evidence, these bombings were blamed on Chechens – instigating a second war with Chechnya.

"Russian troops burying corpses in a trench in Chechnya during the Second Chechen War in February 2000" by Natalia Medvedeva under CC BY-SA 3.0
Russian troops burying corpses in a trench in Chechnya during the Second Chechen War in February 2000” by Natalia Medvedeva under CC BY-SA 3.0

The aggression seen in Grozny repeated itself in December 1999. Under the orders of new Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin  – after he was appointed the position on August 9, 1999, by a soon-to-retire Yeltsin – Grozny was again shelled. This time Russian troops did enter the city, massacring tens of thousands of innocent civilians until February 2000. As Putin viewed it, his troops “fulfilled their task to the end.”

When this task was “fulfilled”, the United Nations declared Grozny as the most destroyed city on Earth. In this second Chechen War, even journalists were targeted by the Russian Federation. Journalists were kidnapped and beheaded for reporting the atrocities being committed. Civilian casualties between the two Chechen Wars ranged from 30,000 to potentially more than 100,000.  

How the 1999 Russian apartment bombings led to Putin’s rise to power – Insider March 22, 2018

What Putin’s destruction of Grozny in 1999 means for Ukraine now – WBUR March 2, 2022

"GROZNY. Acting President Vladimir Putin arrived in Grozny on a SU-27 fighter jet" by Presidential Press and Information Office via www.kremlin.ru under CC BY 3.0 and CC BY 4.0
GROZNY. Acting President Vladimir Putin arrived in Grozny on a SU-27 fighter jet on March 20, 2000” by Presidential Press and Information Office via www.kremlin.ru under CC BY 3.0 and CC BY 4.0

In March 2000, Putin flew to Grozny in a fighter jet to “celebrate” his victory. Putin would go on to himself appoint Akhmad Kadyrov to hold the territory under Kremlin control. 

Russia’s wars in Chechnya offer a grim warning of what could be in Ukraine – NPR March 12, 2022

"RED SQUARE, MOSCOW. Speech during a parade devoted to the 55th anniversary of the USSR's victory in the Great Patriotic War" by Presidential Press and Information Office via www.kremlin.ru under CC BY 3.0 and CC BY 4.0
RED SQUARE, MOSCOW. Speech during a parade devoted to the 55th anniversary of the USSR’s victory in the Great Patriotic War” by Presidential Press and Information Office via www.kremlin.ru under CC BY 3.0 and CC BY 4.0

The false flag operation and the “victory” of Putin’s Chechen war secured his first bid as Russian President with 52.57% of the vote on March 27, 2000.

ELECTION IN RUSSIA: THE OVERVIEW; Putin Wins Russia Vote in First Round, But His Majority Is Less Than Expected – The New York Times March 27, 2000

 

Continued In Part 2: The 2000s (Coming Soon)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Russia Is A Terrorist State Russia Is A Terrorist State Russia Is A Terrorist State Russia Is A Terrorist State Russia Is A Terrorist State 

Russia Is A Terrorist State Russia Is A Terrorist State Russia Is A Terrorist State Russia Is A Terrorist State Russia Is A Terrorist State 

Russia Is A Terrorist State Russia Is A Terrorist State Russia Is A Terrorist State Russia Is A Terrorist State Russia Is A Terrorist State 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *